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RESEARCH JOURNAL
of
WILLIAM and MARGRET BROWN
FAMILY HISTORY [footnote 1]

Covering their ancestors, siblings, children and descendents [fn. 2]

Winter 2000, Vol. 1, No. 1

June 10, 2000

Copyright 2000 by O. James Brown Klein. [fn. 3] All rights reserved.
Editor and Publisher

  1. Journal Index
     
  1. Journal Index
  2. Purposes and Policies of the Research Journal
  3. Journal Motto
  4. Free Internet Subscriptions; Mailed Subscriptions Available
  5. Report of North Carolina Research Trip April 200 by Jim Klein and Erold Wiscombe
  6. Thomas STILLWELL – 1819 Randolph County Estate Papers
  7. William BROWN 19 February 1772 Rowan County Will
  8. Family Research Projects
  9. Family Research Ideas and Theories
  10. Next Journal Issue: Spring 2000 to be published June 30, 2000
  11. The New William and Margret Brown Family History Library and Center
     
  1. Purposes and Policies of the Research Journal

    This is the first volume of the Research Journal of William and Margaret BROWN Family History, which is being published in conjunction with the creation of the William and Margret BROWN Family History Library and Center.

    The primary purpose of the Journal is to provide a vehicle published quarterly on the Internet, with all volumes being filed in the Brown Library where they are available 24 hours daily. The Journal is where those involved in family genealogical and history research can share their research findings with each other, and all interested parties.

    All relevant, accurate and source documented information regarding the William and Margret BROWN family is solicited for publication. All such information, including articles and manuscripts, must be submitted in Microsoft Word computer file format to the Editor 7 days before the quarterly publication dates for consideration, which are: March 31; June 30; September 30; December 31.

    Send all publishable information to: librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

     

  2. Journal Motto
  3. "Ask of God; ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you. For every one that asketh, receiveth; and he that seeketh, findeth; and unto him that knocketh, it shall be opened." JST Matthew 7:12, 13; See also Mathew 7:7, 8.

     

  4. Free Internet Subscriptions; Mailed Subscriptions Available
  5. Free subscriptions are available on the Internet. Send your email subscriptions to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com.

    Mailed subscriptions are available at $5.00 per issue, prepaid. Send your name, address and prepaid subscriptions with checks for the number of issues desired, payable to Klein Storrs Family Association, to: Jim Klein, Editor, Brown Research Journal, 2038 East Kael Circle, Mesa, AZ 85213.

     

  6. Report of North Carolina Research Trip by Jim Klein and Erold Wiscombe
  7. This trip was highly successful. Jim and Erold spent 10 days researching 9 county and state libraries, working long days, and returning with 2 boxes of wonderful information. They will continue to evaluate this information and published their documented findings in subsequent issues of this Research Journal.

    The most significant and miraculous find was the Thomas STILLWELL – 1819 Randolph County Estate Papers which prove beyond doubt that James BROWN’s parents are William and Margaret BROWN of the 19 February 1772 Rowan County Will.

    The next 2 paragraphs, # 6 and # 7, are provided for your information.

     

  8. Thomas STILLWELL – 1819 Randolph County Estate Papers
  9. The key document Jim Klein and Erold Wiscombe found in our April 2000 North Carolina research trip was a 6 page abstract of the Randolph County Estate Papers of Thomas STILLWELL who died in Johnston County in 1819. The court case of this estate lasted from 1819 to at least 1826.

    The source of the abstract is: Randolph County Estate Papers, Thomas STILLWELL – 1819, The Genealogical Journal, by the Randolph County Genealogical Society of the Randolph County Historical Society, North Carolina, Volume 13, Number 3, 1989, Summer, pages 15 – 20.

    The Editor’s note at the beginning of the abstract reads: "This is a large file [which is in the State Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina]. There were several copies of the same documents. This Thomas STILLWELL did not die in Randolph County. [He died in Johnston County where his estate was]. The file appears to have been compiled in the county because of the participation of Seth WADE [an attorney living in Randolph County] in the court case. There is a great deal of genealogical material contained in the documents, so it is printed here. As with most court cases, the testimony is not always in agreement. You, dear reader, may judge. (FHS)"

    The parties in the dispute over Thomas STILLWELL’s estate, including his significant holdings of property and 16 slaves, appear to be as follows:

    Plaintiffs:

    David STILLWELL, James BROWN, Robert JACKSON, and Jacob GOSS and Phebe, his wife.

    The referenced James BROWN is either William BROWN’s son, James, or his grandson, James BROWN (2) who is Captain James Brown. Both are mentioned in the abstract.

    Most significantly, all of William and Margaret BROWN’s 9 children are named in these documents, except John BROWN. Their daughter, Elizabeth, is identified by her husband’s surname, HENDRIX, which really is HEADRICKS. This is so because we found Elizabeth HEADRICKS named in the Toms Creek Baptist Church Minutes where our BROWNs were members during this same time period. James BROWN (2) was a clerk in this church.

    Defendants:

    Philip RAEFORD and Elender W. STILLWELL, administrators of Thomas STILLWELL.

    We obtained copies of all documents in this file at the State Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina. Because of their significance to our family, these documents will be carefully transcribed and published in their entirety in subsequent of the Brown Research Journal.
     

  10. William BROWN 19 February 1772 Rowan County Will
  11. The following is taken from The Brown Family, Descendents of Daniel Brown and Elizabeth Stephens, by Erold Clark Wiscombe, 1986, pages 24 – 26:

    Notes on William Brown Will.

    Transcribed by Kristine A. Card 8 August 1985

    This will is in the State Archives in Raleigh, North Carolina.

    The will is in good condition. The paper is a light brown color and the ink is dark brown, but it is very readable. The will was folded in half right along the line which reads "I give and bequeath to my daughter Margaret Brown one Cow and one year old lamb and". The ink on this line is much more faded than the rest of the document, but it is still readable. However, it is easy to see how the line could be missed if not studied with care.

    The will was obviously written by a scribe and William Brown signed with his mark. The mark is visible between the words William and Brown with the word his over it and the word mark below. The mark is difficult to describe. There is a strong slanted line as in the letter X from upper right to lower left. The cross the other direction is very short and faint above the line of the other diagonal and below is looped and bent.

    Almost every word was readable. The few words that were questionable I have marked with a question mark in brackets following the word, like this [?]. Also in one instance the word my was written where I believe he meant may. I have put may in brackets following my. I have done the same with Being [been].

    I have kept all spellings as they are in the original document and capitalizations as best I could determine. I have preserved all line divisions; because his lines are longer than mine, I have indented all continuations. There were no indentations in the original.

    After the final word in the first paragraph, following, there is a broken line (dashes) from the end of the word to the right edge of the paper; likewise after the word distributed in the next sentence. At the end of each sentence that begins "I give and bequeath" there is a solid line from the last word to the right edge of the paper.

    The word Seal after the name of William Brown is encircled with small, continuous arches, each interior point looped in a small circle. The best description I can think of is an elementary drawing of a cloud.

    After the names of witnesses John Bentley and John Northen, there is something written in very small letters. It looks like the two are identical, and I believe both begin with the letter I, but that is all I could determine.

    William BROWN’s Will:

    In the Name of god Amen I William Brown of the County of Roann in

    The province of North

    Carolina being of a perfect and sound memory tho of a Weak and

    frail body and Calling to mind

    that it is appointed for all men once to Die do Constitute and

    appoint this my last Will and testament

    Revoking and disannulling all other heartofore made by me:

    Imprimis I give my Body to the

    ground from Whence it was first taken and Recommend my Soul into

    the hands of almighty

    god Beseeching his most gracious acceptance of it: as to my

    Burial I desire it my [may] be neat [?] and

    decent without pomp or pride according to the Discretion of my

    Executors hear after named

    and as to this Wordly Estate it has Being [been] the almightys

    pleasure to bestow upon me I Will

    and desire in manner following…

    I will that all my Just Debts be Justly payd before my Estate be

    Distributed

    I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife Margret Brown my

    Improvement where I now

    live and all my houshold furniture and my sheep and my work

    horses and nine head of

    Cattle and my hogs and my plantation working tools during her

    natural life

    I give and bequeath to my daughter Charity Robson one shilling

    sterling and that is all I will give her

    I give and bequeath to my daughter hannah Elliot one shilling

    sterling and that is all I shall give her

    I give and bequeath to my son William Brown one Cow and that is

    all I shall give him

    I give and bequeath to my son John Brown one sorril hors and that

    is all I shall give him

     

    I give and bequeath to my son James Brown one horse Colt and that

    is all I shall give him

    I give and bequeath to my daughter Constant wynn one Cow and that

    is all I shall give her

    I give and bequeath to my daughter Susannah Brown one Cow and

    that is all I shall give her

    I give and bequeath to my duaghter Elizabeth Brown one Cow and

    that is all I shall give her

    I give and bequeath to my daughter Margret Brown one Cow and on

    Year old [?] lamb and

    that is all I shall give her

    I give and bequeath to my grandaughter Margret Brown the daughter

    of Susannah

    Brown one heifer Calf and that is all I shall give her

    and the Remainder of my Estate If there be any left I leave unto

    the disposial

    of my wife Margret Brown

    I do hearby through the love and goodwill I Bear to my well

    beloved friend Henry

    Strange appoint him with my well beloved wife Margret Brown as

    Executor and

    Executrix of this my last will and testament depending on their

    faithfull discharge

    In witness where of I have here unto set my hand and Seal this

    nineteenth day of february

    In the year of our lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy

    two

    Sind Seald and acknoledged in the

    presence of us his

    John Bentley William Brown Seal

    Abner Cotton mark

    John Northen

     

  12. Family Research Projects
  13. Please let all of us know what research projects you are working on so we can coordinate and share our information. Your research projects and their status should be published here.

     

  14. Family Research Ideas and Theories
  15. Please let all of us know what research ideas and theories you are thinking about so we can coordinate and share our information. Your research ideas and theories should be published here.

     

  16. Next Journal Issue: Spring 200 to be published June 30, 2000
  17. We look forward to receiving your contributions for the Spring issue, which will be electronically published on the Internet on June 30, 2000. Thank you.

     

  18. The New William and Margaret BROWN Family History Library and Center

See and participate in the new Brown Library/Center on the Internet at brownhistory.org .  The Research Journals will be permanently stored there for future reference.

Footnotes:

1.  Published quarterly:  March 31; June 30; September 30; December 31.  Free subscriptions are available on the Internet.  Mailed subscriptions are available at $5.00 per issue, prepaid.  Send all inquiries, Internet subscription requests, information, articles and manuscripts according to Journal Policies to O. James Brown Klein, Editor and Publisher, at librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com.  Sponsored by the Klein Storrs Family Association, O. James Brown Klein, President. Affiliated with the William and Margret Brown Family History Library and Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org.

2.  William and Margret BROWN lived in Rowan County, North Carolina in the mid-1700s, with most, if not all of their 9 children.  William was of English and perhaps Scottish descent, and Margaret was of Portuguese descent. We do not yet know who are their ancestors or siblings, and we only have verified who are their descendents through one of their children, James BROWN.

3.  O. James Brown Klein (Jim Klein) is a direct descendent of William and Mrgaret BROWN.  They are his maternal third great grand father and grand mother. Jim is an attorney and business man living in Mesa, Arizona.

Return to Top
 

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 RESEARCH JOURNAL
of
WILLIAM and MARGRET BROWN
FAMILY HISTORY
[footnote 1]

Covering their ancestors, siblings, children and descendents [fn. 2]

Spring 2000, Vol. 1, No. 2
June 30, 2000

Copyright 2000 by O. James Brown Klein. [fn. 3] All rights reserved.
Editor and Publisher

  1. Journal Index
  1. Journal Index
  2. Announcements and Suggestions
  3. Annotated 19 February 1772 Rowan County, NC, Will of William Brown
  4. 1768 Rowan County Tax List of John Ford
  5. Abstract of 1819 Randolph County, NC, Estate Papers of Thomas Stillwell
  6. Family Research Projects
  7. Family Research Ideas and Theories
  8. Next Journal Issue: Summer 2000 to be published September 30, 2000

   2.  Announcements and Suggestions

  1. Brownhistory.org:  Remember to see and participate in our new family Brown Library/Center on the Internet at brownhistory.org. All issues of the Research Journal are permanently stored there for future reference.
  2. Erold Wiscombe’s Book:  The first 60 pages of Erold Wiscombe’s The Brown Family, Daniel and Elizabeth Brown and Their Descendents, 700 pages, 1986, is now available in our Brown Library under Histories.  In my opinion, this book is a classic reference regarding the Brown family. It took Erold 5 years to write it, and he did meticulous research. His first 60 pages deal with William and Margaret BROWN, their children and grandchildren.  The balance of the 700 pages deals with the 4,740 plus descendents of Daniel and Elizabeth STEPHENS BROWN.
  3. Your Inventory List:  Before it is too late, please write down a list of the items you have in your Brown family files and submit this inventory list to the Brown Library for publication in the Special Collections section. Help others you know to do the same. This is important way we can all begin to identify and share what each of us has inherited and researched regarding the family – by simply listing it. Remember, if you have any concerns about making copies of any thing available to others, you can always place any restrictions you decide on any or all of it. On this point, the Library staff would be happy to help you copy any thing you might choose to place in the Library, including letters, journals, histories, pictures, maps, documents or other information. That way, family members could access such items from the Library, without taking your time. But please at least share a list of what you have. Thank you!
  4. Journal Storage:  You may want to print each issue of the Journal, three-hole punch it at the left margin and keep it in a three-ring or other holder, or file it for future reference.

 

   3.  Annotated 19 February 1772 Rowan County, NC, Will of William Brown

 

   4.  1768 Rowan County Tax List of John Ford

 

   5.  Abstract of 1819 Randolph County, NC, Estate Papers of Thomas Stillwell

 

   6.  Family Research Projects

    Please let all of us know what research projects you are working on so we can coordinate and share our information. Your research projects and their status should be published here.

   7.  Family Research Ideas and Theories

    Please let all of us know what research ideas and theories you are thinking about so we can coordinate and share our information. Your research ideas and theories should be published here.

    8.  Next Journal Issue: Summer 2000 to be published September 30, 2000

We look forward to receiving your contributions for the Summer issue, which will be electronically published on the Internet on September 30, 2000. Thank you.

Footnotes:

1.  Published quarterly:  March 31; June 30; September 30; December 31.  Free subscriptions are available on the Internet.  Mailed subscriptions are available at $5.00 per issue, prepaid.  Send all inquiries, Internet subscription requests, information, articles and manuscripts according to Journal Policies to O. James Brown Klein, Editor and Publisher, at librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com.   Sponsored by the Klein Storrs Family Association, O. James Brown Klein, President. Affiliated with the William and Margret Brown Family History Library and Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org.

2.  William and Margret BROWN lived in Rowan County, North Carolina in the mid-1700s, with most, if not all of their 9 children.  William was of English and perhaps Scottish descent, and Margret was of Portuguese descent. We do not yet know who are their ancestors or siblings, and we only have verified who are their descendents through one of their children, James BROWN.

3.  O. James Brown Klein (Jim Klein) is a direct descendent of William and Margret BROWN.  They are his maternal third great grand father and grand mother. Jim is an attorney and business man living in Mesa, Arizona.

Return to Top
 

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 RESEARCH JOURNAL
of
WILLIAM and MARGRET BROWN
FAMILY HISTORY
[footnote 1]

Covering their ancestors, siblings, children and descendents [fn. 2]

Summer 2000, Vol. 1, No. 3
September 30, 2000

Copyright 2000 by O. James Brown Klein. [fn. 3] All rights reserved.
Editor and Publisher

  1. Journal Index
  1. Journal Index.
  2. Announcements.
  3. Addendum to THE BROWN FAMILY by Erold C. Wiscombe, page 4, Regarding Jane BROWN HUGHES and Michael HUGHES:
    1. Jane BROWN and Michael HUGHES.
    2. Hughes Family Group Sheets.
  4. Research from Arlene Miller:
    1. Clarification on the Portuguese/English/Irish Ancestors of Captain James Brown
      and his brother, Daniel Brown.
    2. New Findings: WILLIAMS.
    3. New Findings: STEPHENS.
    4. Note of Interest to the Descendants of James S. Brown.
  5. Appointment of (Captain) Elder James Brown as Church Emigration Agent in New Orleans in 1853, from Ronald B. Hill.
  6. Family Research Projects.
  7. Family Research Ideas and Theories.
  8. Next Journal Issue: Fall 2000 to be published December 31, 2000.

             Please Note:  For some technical reason, we are unable to publish this Journal issue in HTML.  Please use the PDF file.

Footnotes:

1.  Published quarterly:  March 31; June 30; September 30; December 31.  Free subscriptions are available on the Internet.  Mailed subscriptions are available at $5.00 per issue, prepaid.  Send all inquiries, Internet subscription requests, information, articles and manuscripts according to Journal Policies to O. James Brown Klein, Editor and Publisher, at librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com.   Sponsored by the Klein Storrs Family Association, O. James Brown Klein, President. Affiliated with the William and Margret Brown Family History Library and Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org.

2.  William and Margret BROWN lived in Rowan County, North Carolina in the mid-1700s, with most, if not all of their 9 children.  William was of English and perhaps Scottish descent, and Margret was of Portuguese descent. We do not yet know who are their ancestors or siblings, and we only have verified who are their descendents through one of their children, James BROWN.

3.  O. James Brown Klein (Jim Klein) is a direct descendent of William and Margret BROWN.  They are his maternal third great grand father and grand mother. Jim is an attorney and business man living in Mesa, Arizona.

Return to Top
 

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 RESEARCH JOURNAL
of
WILLIAM and MARGRET BROWN
FAMILY HISTORY
Covering their ancestors, siblings, children and descendents

Fall 2000, Vol. 1, No. 4
December 31, 2000

Copyright 2000 by O. James Brown Klein . All rights reserved.
Editor and Publisher

  1. Journal Index
  1. Journal Index.
  2. Announcements.
  3. Addendum to Martha BROWN section of THE BROWN FAMILY HISTORY by Erold C. Wiscombe, page 8, Regarding Martha BROWN BOSS and David BOSS.
  4. Family Research Projects.
  5. Family Research Ideas and Theories.
  6. Next Journal Issue: Winter 2001 to be published March 31, 2001.

    2.    Announcements and Thanks

1.  Thank You to our Contributor!!: A very special thanks to Erold C. Wiscombe! Your time, efforts and sharing a greatly appreciated by the rest of us! We look forward to receiving more from you.

2.  Your Research Projects: We would like to share what research projects any one is doing on William and Margret BROWN and their related lines, and maintain this information in this Journal and in the Brown Library/Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org. See Family Research Projects below. You, or any one you know, is invited to submit what research projects you are working on with how to contact you so that we can organize ourselves on this matter, and know how to contact each other. Please send your information to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

    3. Addendum to the Martha BROWN section of THE BROWN FAMILY HISTORY by Erold C.
        
Wiscombe, page 8, Regarding MARTHA BROWN and DAVID BOSS

        Addendum to the Martha BROWN section of THE BROWN FAMILY HISTORY by Erold C. Wiscombe, page 8

By Erold C. Wiscombe
October 15, 2000
185 North West Temple, # 204
Salt Lake City, Utah 84103
Tel: 801-355-6691

3.1. MARTHA BROWN and DAVID BOSS

Martha Brown, commonly called, "Patsy", was born 24 September 1794, in Rowan Co., North Carolina. She married David Boss, born 1801, also in Rowan County.

David was the second child of eleven children born to Peter and Mary Garner Boss. He was the younger brother of Philip Boss, who married Martha's younger sister, Obedience Brown.

The children of Martha and David, Alexander, Alfred, Calvin, and David Jr., were all born in Davidson County, North Carolina.

Martha's youngest brother, Daniel, had moved to Brown County, Illinois, in 1831, taking with him his two unmarried sisters, Mary "Polly", and Nancy Brown, also his two brothers in law, Alexander and John Stephens, and a nephew, Homer Jackson, his sister Susan's son. Her brother, James Brown, followed in 1833. It was probably at this time that Martha and her family also moved to Illinois. David's father, Peter, and his grandfather, Philip Boss, had moved to Schuyler County, Illinois sometime between 1826-1930. James S. Brown, son of Daniel Brown, stated that his father Daniel was the first of the Brown and Stephens Families to move to Illinois. However, the Boss family was probably there first.

It is not exactly known when David and Martha moved to Illinois, but by 19 January 1846, they were living in Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois, with the Mormons when their eldest son, Alexander, received his patriarchal blessing.

When the Saints were driven from Nauvoo, Illinois, by the mobs in 1846, the Boss Family went with them. The wagon trains were divided up into hundreds, fiftys, and tens. They were in the first hundred, with Daniel Spencer as Captain, the second fifty, with Ira Eldredge, as Captain, and the second ten, with Hector Caleb Haight, as Captain. Captain Haight would be the man they were to answer to.

Their three younger sons, Alfred, Calvin and David Jr. all received their patriarchal blessings at Winter Quarters, Nebraska 30 and 31 April 1847.

Their family crossed the plains and arrived in the Great Salt Lake Valley, 19 September 1847.

The David Boss Family did not remain in Utah Territory very long. Their eldest son, Alexander, was rebaptized 12 February 1848, in Salt Lake City, Utah.

It is not known if the family caught the "gold fever", or just when they moved, but it was likely 1849, when they headed for California. There most likely would have been plenty of travelers to hook up with on this part of the journey, due to the gold rush.

The family settled in Contra Costa County, in the San Francisco Bay area and purchased land for farming between Martinez and Pacheco. They were not listed in the 1850 Census of California, but the land records of Contra Costa County indicated that David Boss bought 80 acres of the Las Juntas Ranch, from the Welch family, for $640.

William Welch, an Irishman, born about 1802, came to California in 1821. He married Maria Antonia Galindo, and together they had large land holdings in the Pleasant Hill area. They were the first ranchers in this area, the Boss Family being the second.

In the early 1850's, California passed a law stating that women could own land in their own name. Anna Maria Welch de Birnie declared that she owned an entire and separate property in her name, also 25 head of cattle, 2 horses and one top buggy she had bought from proceeds of land sold to David Boss.

County records indicate that Calvin Boss was a witness for the County Recorder, Thomas Brown, to documents in 1850. He knew the Spanish people and spoke their language. (History of Pleasent Hill, California, p.63, by Valley Jo Whitfield). This helps prove that the family was indeed in California by 1850.

On the 28th of February 1853, their eldest son, Alexander, purchased 160 acres of land in the vicinity of Monte del Diablo, in Contra Costa County. On 28 October 1853, Alfred purchased 160 acres of government land in Mount Diablo Township of the same County. Later, 12 Dec 1853, his twin brother, Calvin, purchased 160 acres of government land in the same Mount Diablo Township. Then on 1 August 1853, the youngest brother, David Jr. purchased 160 acres of government land near Martinez.

The barn built by David Boss was said to be the first one built in the Pleasant Hill area.

The 1860 Census of Contra Costa County, California, lists in house number 499, David Boss, 62, a farmer, born in N.C., with $12,000 worth of real estate and $8,300, in personal estate. His wife, Martha, was 68.

In the next house, #500, lived the eldest son, Alexander, 32, a farmer with $6,000 worth of real estate, and $1800 in personal estate. The census taker listed his wife as Eliza J., 18, born in Illinois, but her name was actually Elitha Jane Clark, born 5 August 1843, a daughter of James Clark of Ohio. Their son, George W. Boss, age one month, born May 1960, was living with them.

The house next to Alexander, #501, belonged to Alfred Boss, 28, who owned $2500 in real estate, and $1620 in personal estate. He also had a wife, Eliza, 23, born in Missouri. Her name was actually, Emma Ameline Davis. They also had a three year old son, Andrew, living with them, and Alfred's twin brother, Calvin Boss, 28, who owned $3000 worth of real estate and $1130 in personal estate. In the same house lived also the youngest brother, David Boss Jr., 27, also worth $3000 in real estate and $1566 in personal estate.

In the short time the family lived in California, they had done quite well for themselves, financially. However, Brigham Young had warned the Saints in the Salt Lake Valley that if they went to the gold fields, they would lose far more then they gained. None of Martha's descendants remained in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Alexander Boss

The early marriage records of Contra Costa County are not complete. The 1900 Census of California stated that Alexander and Elitha J. had been married 41 years. That would make them married in 1859. This census also stated they had had six children and five were still living. Other census records presents some problems. Compare the following:

1870 Census   
                    
1880 Census

Alexander, 47, b. NC         Alexander, 55, NC
Elitha, 27, b. Ill.                   Elitha, 37, Ill.
George, 10, b. Cal.             George W., 20, Cal.
Elizabeth, 9, b.Cal.              Elizabeth, 19, Cal.
Florence, 8, b.Cal.(female)  Francis, 17, Cal. (male)
James, 6, b.Cal.                  James H.,15, Cal.
Clara, 4, b.Cal.                   Clara B.,13, Cal.
Carra, 1, b.Cal.                   Nellie May, 11, Cal.

The census taker obviously made an error with Florence. They did have a son Francis called Frank. Also Carra and Nellie May are the same person. Contra Costa did not start keeping birth records until 1906, so it is difficult to prove some of these problems.

The second son, Alfred, married, 1 Oct. 1854, in Contra Costa County, Emma Ameline Davis, born in Missouri. Alfred's twin brother, Calvin, married 11 Nov 1862, Hulda M. Lee. This was recorded in Vol. 1 p.44, they were married by Justice of Peace, W.K. Leavitt. The youngest son, David Jr. married 1862, Lucy S. Kinger, who was born in Virginia.

Martha Brown Boss died in 1869, according to family records kept by her brothers. Contra Costa County burials were not recorded this early. Her husband, David Boss, was living with Alfred's family in 1870, or rather, Alfred and Emma A., with six year old Willie, were living with Alfred's father, David Boss, 70, a retired farmer.

David Senior, now owned $16,000 of real estate and $2600 in personal estate. According to the census, he was 70 years old, but when he died, 6 April 1873, the record stated he was 71. He died at his home near Pacheco, Contra Costa, California. Alfred had preceded his father in death, when he died 29 March 1971.

A complete record of the grandchildren of Martha and David has been difficult to find. The Census record help some, but others were found in cemetery records.

The Alhambra Cemetery at Martinez, Contra Costa County, California contains the following entries.

Frank Boss, died 24 Dec 1887, age 25, farmer. He died near Pacheco of consumption.
Miss Nettie Boss died 21 June 1918, age 55, at Martinez.
Mrs. Zelitha (Elitha) Boss died 26 May 1917, age 74.
David Boss, died 6 Apr 1873, born in NC, age 71.
Alfred Boss died 29 Mar 1871, age 40, of pneumonia.
Calvin Boss died 17 Feb 1866, age 39 years, 4 months and 10 days, near Pacheco.
David Boss Jr. died 14 Sep 1864, age 34. There are other discrepancies in David's birth records. When he received his patriarchal blessing, 31 Apr 1847, he listed his birth date as 26 March 1827. This would only be five months after the birth of his older twin brothers. His death record indicated he was born in 1830. Early records indicate he was born in North Carolina, one of the census records listed Illinois for his birth.

In the 1900 and 1910 Census the question is asked: "Where were you born? Where was your father born? Where was your mother born?" We get all kinds of strange answers. It leaves one to wonder if children ever talked to their parents about such matters.

The land records of Contra Costa County furnish some of the best information on the family. In 1850, David received 80 acres of land from the Welch’s for $640. On 2 Sept. 1852, he took lots 17, 18, and 21, for $480, a total of 160 acres. On 10 July 1856, he took lot 20 of 143 1/3 acres for $430. This would give him over 200 acres. Each of his four sons also owned 160 acres near by, plus additional land they owned later.

David Boss died 6 April 1873, at the age of 71, near Pacheco, Contra Costa, California. His estate was in Decree of Distribution, 9 July 1880, to the family with eldest son, Alexander Boss, as administrator.

Research done by Muriel and Coulter Claeys, a great great grandson of Alexander states:

"They came from Illinois in 1849 by covered wagon. On 18 May 1853, Alexander leased from Juan Welch, land grant 'Rancho San Gabriel'. On 18 Jan 1854, he purchased this land for 75 cents an acre. Ref: Vol. 1 p.393; Vol. III pp.518-520; Vol. IV pp.144 and 147. On 8 June 1880, Alexander purchased for his family and heirs, Rancho Las Juntas. Ref: Vol. 58, p.259. His heirs now owned 6,000 plus 1500 acres in the Pleasant Hill Area.

"Alexander married at age 30, Elitha Jane Clark, by eloping with her on horseback. She was 17 years old. He died 1904, at the age of 82, and was buried in the Boss Cemetery plot in Martinez. His wife died in 1917, at the age of 74. She is buried by her husband.

"Between the Boss and Clark Families, they owned 9,820 acres in 1860."

Alexander's brothers did not live long in California. The youngest brother, David Jr. died 14 Sep 1864, at the age of 34. He had only been married less than two years. He left one child, Mary Ann. In 1865, his wife Lucy S. Kinger Boss remarried, William Hill Dukes, and had six more children.

Calvin Boss, the third son of the Boss Family, married 11 Nov 1862, Hulda M. Lee. He died three years and three months later, 14 Feb 1866. It is not known if he left any children. His wife could have remarried or moved away before the 1870 Census was made. No children were found for this couple.

Alfred Boss, died 29 Mar 1871, at the age of 40. He had two children, Andrew and William. Andrew must have died before the 1870 Census, as Willie was the only child listed with this family in that census.

When the distribution of the Boss properties was made in 1881, lots l and 2 went to Mary Ann Boss and William F. Boss, the two surviving children of David Jr. and Alfred Boss. This would probable indicate that Calvin didn't leave any posterity. Additional information is found on the family group sheets.

____________________________________________________

Document Data

Notes: Minor spelling and punctuation corrections provided.
Sources: Sources are identified by Erold C. Wiscombe.
Copyright: Used by permission.
Level: B (document verified and proofed by the transcriber or typist).
Certificate: Document Donor: Erold C. Wiscombe, October 15, 2000. Transcribed: Erold C. Wiscombe, October, 2000. Verified/Proofed: Erold C. Wiscombe October 15, 2000. See Donors.

Editor’s Note:
Erold prepared family group sheets reflecting this new information, which will be placed in the library once a GEDCOM file has been prepared using this information.

____________________________________________________

    4.  Family Research Projects

Please let all of us know what research projects you are working on so that all family researchers can coordinate and share our information. We invite you to share your research projects and their status so that they may be published here. Please email your information to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

    5.  Family Research Ideas and Theories

Please let all of us know what research ideas and theories you are thinking about so we can coordinate and share our information. We invite you to share your research ideas and theories and their status so that they may be published here. Please email your information to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

    6.  Next Journal Issue: Winter 2001 to be published March 31, 2001

We look forward to receiving your contributions for the Winter issue, which will be electronically published on the Internet on March 31, 2001. Thank you.

Footnotes:

1.  Published quarterly:  March 31; June 30; September 30; December 31.  Free subscriptions are available on the Internet.  Mailed subscriptions are available at $5.00 per issue, prepaid.  Send all inquiries, Internet subscription requests, information, articles and manuscripts according to Journal Policies to O. James Brown Klein, Editor and Publisher, at librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com.   Sponsored by the Klein Storrs Family Association, O. James Brown Klein, President. Affiliated with the William and Margret Brown Family History Library and Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org.

2.  William and Margret BROWN lived in Rowan County, North Carolina in the mid-1700s, with most, if not all of their 9 children.  William was of English and perhaps Scottish descent, and Margret was of Portuguese descent. We do not yet know who are their ancestors or siblings, and we only have verified who are their descendents through one of their children, James BROWN.

3.  O. James Brown Klein (Jim Klein) is a direct descendent of William and Margret BROWN.  They are his maternal third great grand father and grand mother. Jim is an attorney and business man living in Mesa, Arizona.

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 RESEARCH JOURNAL
of
WILLIAM and MARGRET BROWN
FAMILY HISTORY

Covering their ancestors, siblings, children and descendents

Winter 2001, Vol. 2, No. 1

March 31, 2001

Copyright 2001 by O. James Brown Klein . All rights reserved.

Editor and Publisher

  1. Journal Index
  1. Journal Index.
  2. Announcements.
  3. Addendum to Obedience BROWN section of THE BROWN FAMILY HISTORY by Erold C. Wiscombe, page 11, Regarding Obedience BROWN BOSS and Phillip BOSS and their descendants.
  4. Family Research Projects.
  5. Family Research Ideas and Theories.
  6. Next Journal Issue: Spring 2001 to be published June 30, 2001.

    2.    Announcements and Thanks

1.    Thank You to our Contributor: A very special thanks again to Erold C. Wiscombe! Your continuing time, effort and sharing are greatly appreciated by the rest of us! We look forward to receiving more from you.

2.  Your Research Projects: We would like to share what research projects any one is doing on William and Margret BROWN and their related lines, and maintain this information in this Journal and in the Brown Library/Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org. See Family Research Projects below. You, or any one you know, are invited to submit what research projects you are working on including how to contact you, so that we can better organize ourselves on research, and know how to contact each other. Please send your information to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

    3. Addendum to the Obedience BROWN section of THE BROWN FAMILY HISTORY by Erold C. Wiscombe, page 11, Regarding OBEDIENCE BROWN and PHILLIP BOSS

Addendum to the Obedience BROWN (BOSS) section
of THE BROWN FAMILY HISTORY by Erold C. Wiscombe, page 11.

By Erold C. Wiscombe
January 25, 2001
185 North West Temple, # 204
Salt Lake City, Utah 84103-1548
Tel: 801-355-6691

3.1. OBEDIENCE BROWN and PHILIP BOSS

Unlike the History of the Stephens Family, where two brothers came with the early pioneers to Utah, then kept a lively correspondence with all their brothers and sisters, giving us a wonderful record of names of children along with known birth dates of all the relatives, the Boss Family has no such record.

For the benefit of all our Boss relatives, it might be well here to insert two family group sheets on the parents and grandparents of Philip Boss, husband of Obedience Brown Boss. This Philip was named after his grandfather:

Philip Boss, born abt 1775.

Will: 17 Aug 1800 - Proved 7 Aug 1807 in Rowan County, N.C.
Anna Spidle, (or Spidel) born 1779; died ca 1821-1823, in Davidson Co., N.C., daughter of Maximillian Spidle Sr. (1710-1781) and Margaretta.

Children
:

Henry Boss, born 1768 in Rowan Co., N.C. He died 24 May 1831. He married Mary Goss, a daughter of Frederick Goss.

Mary Margaret Boss, born 1770, in Rowan Co., N.C. She died Jan. 1826. She married Jacob Lopp.

Elizabeth Boss, born 10 May 1772, in Rowan Co., N.C. She died 4 June 1861. She married 29 Mar 1794, David Goss, a son of Frederick Goss.

Barbara Boss, born abt 1774 in Rowan Co. N.C. She died by 1821. She married (1) Martin Frank, (2) John Richard.

Peter Boss, born 1776 in Rowan County, N.C. He died 1837-1840, in Davidson Co., N.C. He married Mary Garner, a daughter of Philip Garner.

Mary Ann Boss, born 10 May 1778, in Rowan Co., N.C. She died 8 Oct 1954. She married 1797, George Goss, a son of Frederick.

Catherine Boss, born abt 1780 in Rowan Co., N.C. She married Henry Bruner.

Will of Philip Boss (1775-1807) Vol. 26: p. 355. 28 Mar 1821: Barbara, wife of John Richard; Elizabeth, wife of David Goss: Margaret, wife of Jacob Lopp; Catharine (X) widow of Henry Bruner; Mary, wife of George Goss; and Peter Boss (signed in German), as legatees of Philip Boss, to Joseph Goss for $500, 279 and one half acres on Four Mile Branch, adjacent to Henry Workman and Henry Goss. Wit: (German name) John Frank. Proved by Francis Hedrick at May Court 1821.

Peter Boss Family: born 1776 in Rowan Co., N.C. He died 1837-1840 in Davidson Co., N.C. He married:

Mary Garner, born 1779-80, of Rowan Co., N.C. She was a daughter of Philip Garner and Elizbeth Wickler.

Children:

Philip Boss, born abt 1778, Rowan Co., N.C. He died Dec 1838 in Davidson Co., N.C. He married 1818, Obedience Brown.

David Boss, born 1801, Rowan Co., N.C. He died 6 Apr 1873, near Pacheco, Contra Costa, California. He married 25 Nov 1821, Martha Brown, sister to Obedience.

Elizabeth Boss, born 1803, Rowan Co., N.C.

Mary Boss, born 1805, Rowan Co., N.C. She married John Sevier.

Sarah Boss, born 1807, Rowan Co., N.C. She died 1843. She married Willis or William Hicks.

John Boss, born 1809, Rowan Co., N.C. He died 9 Jul 1890. He married 1 Apr 1850 in Brown County, Illinois, Minerva Barker.

child Boss, born 1810, Rowan Co., N.C.

Henry Boss, born 1811, Rowan Co., N.C. He died 1898. He married Susannah Hettrick.

Polly Boss, born 1812-1813, Rowan Co., N.C. She married 16 Jan 1840 in Brown County, Illinois, (1) Burrill Stinson.

Peter Boss, born 1814, Rowan Co., N.C. He died 1904. He married 12 Apr 1840, Elizabeth Gilmore; (2) 17 Mar 1847, Elsie Suratt; (3) 26 Jun 1879, Mrs. Mary Lemont Peters. He was a converted Mormon, and started with his family for Salt Lake City. His wife became very ill so he returned to Brown County, Illinois. She died and he and his daughters stayed in Brown County, Illinois.

Andrew Boss, born 1816, Rowan Co., N.C. He married 15 Sep 1845, Jeroma Miller.

William Boss, born 1818l, Rowan Co., N.C. He married in North Carolina Anne Christine Frank, born 25 Nov 1820 in Rowan Co., N.C. He died 11 May 1896., Cooperstown, Brown County, Illinois.

The History of Brown County, Illinois, p. 477: "The progenitor of the numerous Boss Families seems to have been Philip Boss, who moved with his son, Peter, born 1774-75, and died 1837-1840, and his wife, Anna (1779) and family to Brown County Illinois from Davidson County, North Carolina, probably as early as 1826-30."

The article then goes on to mention the names of some of Peter Boss' children. There are many errors in the article such as "Obedience Brown was the daughter of Williams Brown". She was a daughter of James Brown and a grand daughter of William. The article includes the name of William Boss (1820) as one of Peter's children. He was a son of Philip and Obedience Boss.

The entire article is a misconception in that neither Philip nor his son, Peter, moved to Brown County, Illinois. Both died in Rowan Co., N.C. The senior Philip Boss left a will in Rowan County, N.C. 17 Aug 1800. It was proved, 7 Aug 1807. He left six children. His eldest son, Henry had ten children, five of them moved to Washington County, Indiana. They were the progenitors of a large part of the Boss Family in Indiana.

Philip's only other son, Peter, the father of the husband of Obedience, likewise did not move to Brown County, Illinois. He died in Rowan Co., N.C., but nearly all of his children moved to Brown County. All of them did not go to Brown County at the same time. In July 1843, Elizabeth, Henry, Andrew and William were still living in Davidson Co., N.C., with their mother, Mary Garner Boss. Henry moved to Brown County, Illinois between 1850-1860. Andrew went there between 1850-1852. William moved the same time as Andrew. Elizabeth did not marry. It is not known if she moved north with the rest of the family.

The mother, Mary Garner Boss, died in Davidson Co., N.C. She left a will dated 16 July 1843. She left various sums of money to most of her children who had already moved north. The stock and household goods went to the four children who had remained in North Carolina with her.

This writer has made an extensive study of the Boss Family in Brown and Schuyler Counties in Illinois in order to separate the children of Obedience and Philip from those of her husband's brothers who went there earlier.

The short history of Obedience as written in the Brown Family History will remain as stated. This history will be a reconstruction of her family. It will concern itself mainly with her descendants. Where they went and what happened to them. A copy of the numerous descendants of her husband's brothers will also be sent to James B. Klein, if he chooses to put them on the internet, that is up to him.

You may recall from the history of Obedience's sister, Martha Brown Boss who had married the younger brother [David Boss] to Obedience's husband, they moved to California. California had passed very early laws stating that women could own land in their own name and right. Obedience did not have the benefit of such a law in North Carolina. Many early Wills will stipulate that the widow is to have the benefit of the property and all of its goods for the remainder of her mortal life, then it would be sold and divided among the children.

Philip Boss, Obedience's husband, died intestate, meaning he died and left no Will. Therefore, an inventory of all his goods and possessions had to be made and sold to pay off all debts.

The widow could petition the court for a one-year supply of goods from her husband's estate. which she did, February 1839. Since the language is very colorful, her petition is included here. The spelling has not been changed.

The courts of early 1800 North Carolina did not move any quicker than our courts today. There are some 27 long pages of documents relating to this case. A summary will be made here to save you the boredom of going through the lengthy court documents. It lasted from 1839 to 1844.

"To the worshipful the justices of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions: February Term 1839."

            The Petition of Obedience Boss

"Humbly complaining your Petitioner sheweth unto your, worships, that her husband Philip Boss, late of said County, departed this life in December 1838. Intestate, leaving your petitioner his widow---That he died possessed of a crop stock and provisions on hand, and other personal Estate, out of which she is entitled by law to a years allowance for the support of herself and family.

"Your Petitioner therefore prays your worships to appoint a Justice of the Peace and three freeholders of said County Commissioners, unconnected with her by affinity or consanguinity & wholy uninterested to lay off and allot to her, out of the crops stock and provisions on hand what shall be a sufficient for the support of your petitioners & her family for one year and that they lay off to her one bed and furniture, one wheel and a pair of cards according to act of Assembly and if there be not sufficient of crop stock and povisions on hand that then said Commissioners assess such portion in money as they may think will make up the deficiency and your Petitioner as in duty bound will ever prey etc" Signed by Obedience Boss by Wm. P. Mendenhall, Attorney.

The court appointed David Huffman, Justice, and George Cross Sen., Abram Palmer and George Harris as freeholders. May 1839.

The bleed-through copies of the original documents is very heavy, making it difficult to read. The first page lists $432.76 and 3/4 cents from sale of fat hogs, cattle, sheep and one mare etc.

The second page shows $188.88 3/4 from the sale of such items: plank, rifle gun, saws chisels, 4 beds, table & chest, cupboard & furniture, stilards & shears, 2 flax wheels and one loom, pots, table, pales, candlemaker, coffee mill, pepper mill & tubs, grine stone, one pot cittle (sic), sithes & cradles, oats, one dagon plow, half bushels, barrels, hogsheads and tubs.

The third page lists more barrels, crocks, tubs, one heckle and 2 jugs, lot of timber etc. for $8.58 and 1/2 cents. The total amount of sales of property & estate of Philip Boss came to $630.24, which was a rather large amount for early 1800's. This shows that Philip was a good provider.

The costs of: l. letters of adm.; 2. Crying of sale, 3. lawyers; 4. clerks fee; came to $10.60, which was a lot of money then, but nothing to what lawyers fees would be today.

In Nov 1841, Biddy Boss, (nickname of Obedience), Ex parte Petition for Dower. She states that her husband at the time of his death had about 150 acres of land. She asks the court to set off one third of the land and put her in possession of it, also the house or mansion in which her husband usually resided.

21 Dec 1841: The court attended by 12 freeholders set off one third of the property, 50 acres, for Biddy Boss. This document also stated that Philip Boss had died on the said property of Lick Creek. The measurements of the property was given and signed by the 12 freeholders. The next document lists amounts paid out to 28 persons for $352.67 and 3/4 cents. Including Obedience who received $81.25 and three of her children.

In the Feb. 1839 court, they did lay off and allot to Obedience Boss and her family the following one years provisions. All the corn on hand, all the bacon on hand, all the lard on hand, all the sope (soap) and sope grease, all the salt on hand, all the flax on hand, 4 head of sheep, 2 cows, 200 pounds of bacon not on hand, 50 pounds of coffee, not on hand, 50 pounds of sugar, not on hand, 5 gallons of molasses, not on hand, 30 pounds of picked cotton, not on hand, $15 dollars worth of leather, not on hand, 2 pounds of paper, not on hand, 20 bushels of wheat, not on hand, plus 13 bushels that were on hand, one bed & furniture, on hand, and one wheel & chards, on hand. They also allotted her one note on Ransom Harris worth $42.30, also they lay off to her $38.75 for things she bought at the sale of her husbands possessions.

In the inventory of Philip's estate it seemed a few people owed him money such as: One note on William Davis for $3.43. Two judgements on Sion Jackson for $19.20 with interests and costs, all of which was desperate. (Sion was married to Susan Brown, one of Obedience's older sisters, it seems from court documents that Sion owed a lot of people and there seemed little chance of collecting any of it, hence the use of the term "desperate"). There was one note on Bansour Harris for $42.30.

Other possessions of Philip include 4 head of horses, 8 head of cattle, 11 head of sheep, 55 head of hogs, 180 bushels of corn, 55 bushels of wheat, 2500 sheaves of oats, one lot of straw, 5 stacks of fodder, a quantity of flax and some shucks, one wagon and gears, one set of blacksmith tools, 2 rifle guns, 5 saddles, 4 beds, one cupboard & furniture, 2 tables, 3 chests, one cross cut saw, 2 hand saws, several augers, chisels, one square and some plains, 2 cotton wheels and cards, 3 flax wheels and one loom, one grine stone, 8 axes, 3 mattuck, 5 plows 4 hoes, 6 pots & ovens, one heckle, 2 cutting knives, 3 hogsheads and some barrels & tubs and some shoemaking tools and some other house hole (sic) and kitchen furniture too tedious to mention. (Spelling as in document.) Signed by Benjamin Lanier.

Philip was an industrious man and provided well for his family. If he had left a Will, we probably wouldn't be reading about all his little possessions.

In the Spring of 1842, the petition of William Harris, purchaser and grantee of Obedience Boss and William Boss, Philip Boss, Henry Boss, Willis Boss, Polly Boss, Sally Boss, Nancy Boss, Solomon Boss and John Boss, minors, was made. William doesn't want the land divided, but wishes to purchase all of it as is.

Many people in listing children of Philip and Obedience leave off the name of Solomon, the next to the youngest child. This document clearly states he was one of the children.

April Term 1842, the court of Equity for Davidson County, N.C. approved the sale of Philip Boss' land. Signed by W. Wommack, Clerk of Equity.

The petitioners (Boss Family) had petitioned the court to sell the land in the Spring term of Court of Equity, 1842.

Obedience must have made up her mind to move to Illinois where her two sisters had gone, and most of her husband's brothers had moved to. By April 1844, the land had been sold for $197.25. There were eight shares of the money that went to Obedience and her children.

The eldest son, William Boss, received for his share of his father's personal property $24.65.

William Harris, guardian of the heirs of Philip Boss, bought the extra share belonging to William Boss, 2 Apr 1844. This completed the settlement and his guardianship. James Brown, the brother of Obedience who was already living in Illinois was appointed guardian, 11 Feb 1845.

Obedience and her children moved to Illinois after 1844. She was living in one of the communities near Nauvoo when her home was burned down by the mob. She moved to Utah with the rest of the Mormons in 1849. She died 9 Oct 1850, and was buried in Ogden, Utah, in the old burial ground. In 1926, when the brick yard was under construction her body was exhumed and put on display in the Weber County building until family members claimed the bones and had her reburied on the Daniel B. Rawson lot in the same grave with her infant granddaughter, Helen Obedience Boss, one of Willis' daughters who had died in infancy.

There is a note on the burial card for Helen Obedience Boss to the effect that her grandmother, Obedience Brown Boss' bones were later buried in the same grave with her.

Children of Philip and Obedience Brown Boss

1. William Boss (1820).

The Historical and Cemetery Record of Brown County, Illinois 1825-1972, states that this William Boss "lived in Hancock Co., Ill." He did not come West with his mother and other family members. He is very easily confused with his Uncle William Boss, the son of Peter & Mary Garner Boss, who was born June 1818, and married Anna Christina Frank.

In my history of Obedience Brown in the Brown Family History I stated that William (1820), married C. Frank. This was an error. This William married 31 Dec 1844, probably in Nauvoo, Ill. Jane Pincock, a British convert to the LDS Church. They took out their license to marry in Lee County, Iowa, 30 Dec 1844. Then on 25 Nov 1844, William received his Patriarchal Blessing at Augusta, Iowa.

William and Jane moved to Union Twp., Monroe Co., Iowa. The 1860 Census of Iowa indicated that William and Jane, 32, born in England, had five children. The first child was born in Illinois, the next four were born in Iowa.

William next moved to Marion Twp., Newton Co., Missouri, where he was living in 1870. By 1880 they were living in Joplin, Jasper Co., Missouri, where William died in the year 1898. They were living next to their daughter, Charlotte Gardner.

In the 1900 Census of Missouri, Jane is 74 years old, and a widow, living with her eldest daughter, Charlotte, in Jasper Co., Missouri.

In 1901, Jane took a trip to Salt Lake City, Utah to visit her younger brother, John Pincock. While she was there she died 28 March 1901. The Pincocks later had the temple work done for her, but had her sealed to John Boss. John was only a nine-year-old boy when Jane married his brother, William.

For the descendants of William and Jane, see the accompanying family group sheets.

2. Andrew Boss (1822).

Some of the same information could also be repeated for Andrew as it was for William. He is often confused with his Uncle Andrew (1818). The Uncle married Jeroma Miller in North Carolina and there is a lot of information on him and his family. More research needs to be done on the 1822 Andrew. He did go back to Brown County and lived near his Uncles.

3. Philip Boss (1824).

Luckily, he is the only Philip Boss mentioned at this period of time in Brown County, Illinois. He married twice and lived and died in Brown County. His first wife was called Louisa, but I believe her full name was Eliza Ann De Hart. She was born 1824, in Indiana, and was buried as Louisa Boss, wife of P. Boss, 20 Sep 1850, at age 33, in the De Hart Cemetery in Brown County.

This couple had two children, William H. (1847) and Mary E. (1849). Philip remained single for 12 years, then remarried again 30 Apr 1862, in Brown County, Illinois, to Elizabeth Allison, born Sep 1840. She was eighteen years younger than Philip and not much older than her two step children.

Philip and Elizabeth had three more children. They lived in Cooperstown Twp. in Brown County. Their eldest son, John H. Boss (1864) died at the age of 18 years, 11 months, and 23 days. Their two daughters, Matilda C. and Mary Obedience both married in Brown County, Illinois.

Mary Obedience Boss married twice. He first husband, William L. Hill, was from Cooperstown Twp. also, although Mary said she was born at Versailles on her marriage record. A death record for her first husband was not found. There was a record of a Mary Hill in the 1900 Census who had been adopted by the George W. Bates Family. This child was born Feb 1889. It is not known if she was a child of William and Mary Obedience.

Mary's second husband was William Jasper Thomas. They had one son, Ivan Rexford Thomas, (1892). Mary must have suffered some complications as she died six weeks later. Her husband Jasper remarried and had five more children.

Mary's only son named his first child Helen Obedience, thus the name of Obedience Brown Boss is carried on in more than one line of her family.

The remaining six children of Obedience Brown Boss all chose to follow their mother to Utah except Henry who went back to Brown County, Illinois to live.

4. Willis Boss (1827).

In 1850, Obedience Brown Boss died in Ogden, Utah. Her daughter, Nancy, married Daniel Berry Rawson. Nancy's younger brothers, Willis, 23, Solomon, 18, and John, 16, are all living with sister Nancy. There is also a 5 month old Sarah C. Boss living with them. The child was born in Missouri. It is not known whom she belongs to at this time. That was the only record found of her.

Willis entered into plural marriage as did a number of members of early Mormon couples. His first wife was Dorothy Merrill Hall, born 1832, in Oxford Co., Maine. She was the mother of nine children though six of them died quite young, from infancy to age 16.

Willis' second wife was Marinda Moffett, who also became the mother of nine children, making a total of 18 children for Willis. Again, six of the nine children of this marriage died in infancy.

What should have been a mighty posterity for Willis, just wasn't so. As of this writing, the two grandchildren of his daughter, Delilah, are the only grandchildren found in this family. Perhaps others will be found later.

After the Edmunds-Tucker law was passed by Congress it became much more difficult to trace some polygamous families, as many didn't want to be found by the federal marshals in the territory.

5. Nancy Boss (1829).

Nancy was the young girl that went to work for Levi Williams, the man who was most responsible for the death of the Prophet, Joseph Smith. She was rescued from death herself by her Uncle, James Brown.

Nancy started West with her mother and the Mormon pioneers. She married Nov. 1849, probably in Ogden, Utah, to Daniel Berry Rawson. Her mother died in early 1850, and by the time the census taker came she was also caring for her three younger brothers, Willis, Solomon and John Boss, along with a five-month old girl Sarah C. Boss, who was born in Missouri. It is difficult to determine just who this little girl is. She is listed after the names of the boys, which would indicate she was a Boss. Nancy and Daniel's first child was not born until June of 1851.

All family group records for the Rawson Family show 10 children. One record found indicated there was another child named Silas Rawson born 26 Aug 1867. If this is correct then he would be a twin brother to Samantha Delena, who was also born on that day. This child could have died the same day.

The Harrisville Church records mentioned when D.B. Rawson blessed Charlotte and David Benjamin, the children born both, before and after these twins, but there is no mention of him blessing either Samantha Dalena nor Silas. The first mention of Samantha is in the church records comes eight years later when she is baptized and confirmed by her father. She may have been blessed at home if circumstances warranted, and not recorded in the church record. No record was found for the death of Silas.

Nancy's children were born, first three in Ogden, Utah, the next two in Farmington, Utah, the two following back in Ogden again, and the last three in Harrisville, Utah, which is a area very near Ogden.

Nancy was 22 years old in 1850, so she must have married at age 21. Both she and her husband show much activity in their church, both holding positions of responsibility. Since there was no temple to marry in, they were sealed in the Endowment House, 21 Feb. 1860, just a few months after the birth of their fifth child.

Daniel B. Rawson also had a polygamous relationship. His first wife, Martha Atchinson, he married 9 Nov. 1845, probably in Nauvoo, Illinois. Nancy was his second wife. He married (3) in March 1866, Mary Malvina Taylor, and (4) Mary Brown. He had a large posterity from all four wives.

Nancy died 20 March 1888, in Far West, Weber, Utah, another settlement near Ogden. She was 59 years old at the time.

6. Solomon Boss (1832).

The first mention of Solomon is in a Master’s Thesis on Mormon Land Ownership as a Factor in Evaluating the Extent of Mormon Settlement and Influence in Missouri, 1831 – 1841, by Wayne J. Lewis, Department of History, Brigham Young University, August 1981, page 96. Lewis lists the names of Mormons living in Missouri during 1831-1841. Both Solomon and John Boss are mentioned, pages 95 – 96.

In the 1850 Census of Ogden, Weber, Utah, 18 year old Solomon, born in North Carolina was living with his sister, Nancy and his two brothers, Willis and John. His name was mentioned in the distribution of property and money to the heirs of Philip Boss. No other record has been found on him. The very early death records of Ogden were not kept, unless it was done by family members. Such was the death record of his mother.

There was another Solomon Boss mentioned in Weber County, Utah, but he is older and seems to belong to a Swiss Boss Family who were also early converts to the Church. There is also another family of Boss, from Holland living in Weber County during Pioneer Days.

7. Henry Boss (1832).

Henry must have accompanied his brother, Philip, back to Brown County, Illinois after the mob burned his mother's house down near Nauvoo.

He married in Brown County, Illinois, 19 Aug. 1852, Vol. A-B p. 87) to Julia Ann Jones. The 1850 census lists Henry and Julia with a three-year-old son, W.T. Boss in Brown County, Illinois. A four year old Sarah Lane and 23 year old John Jones, probably a brother-in-law, were living with them.

Henry also had an Uncle, Henry Boss, (1811), living in Brown County. The elder Henry was married to Susannah Black Hettrick. They had three children. No other information has been found on the son, W.T., born to Henry and Julia Boss.

8. John Boss (1835).

The first mention of this lad is in the distribution of wealth to the heirs of Philip Boss, in North Carolina. He went to Illinois with his mother. He was also mentioned in the Master’s Thesis by Lewis of Mormon Land Ownership in Missouri 1831-1841, page 95. He was mentioned along with his elder brother Solomon.

The 1850 Census of Ogden, Weber, Utah next shows John, age 16, from North Carolina, living with his sister, Nancy Boss Rawson 22, and his brothers Willia 23, and Solomon 18.

John is not mentioned in either the 1860 nor 1870 Census of Utah, but in 1880, he is living with his wife in Santaquin, Utah, Utah. The LDS Ward records of Santaquin first mentions this Boss Family. John married 1871, at the age of 26, to Mrs. Elizabeth "Betsy" Horrocks Taylor, widow of Joseph Taylor.

The many archive records of Philip and Obedience Boss lists John married to an Elizabeth Hancock. This is an error, as Elizabeth "Betsy" lived eleven years longer than her husband, John. She is buried in the Santaquin Cemetery as Betsy Boss.

Elizabeth "Betsy" Boss and her first husband, Joseph Taylor were the parents of 8 children.

The 1880 Census of Santaquin, Utah, lists John Boss, 41, and wife Betsy, 42, and 10 year old John Taylor, living with them. There is no record of John Boss having had any children of his own. He did help Betsy in raising her children.

Betsy must have answered the questions for the census taker as she lists John's birthplace as Alabama. In the Santaquin Ward records he states several times that his birth date a 2 Dec 1835, in North Carolina.

Many early Mormon records during the exodus period were either poorly kept, or lost, so the church in Utah began the practice of rebaptizing everyone over again, for the records sake. John was re-baptized 18 Oct 1875, in Santaquin, Utah by John D. Holladay. His membership was re-confirmed by Lane Openshaw. He mentioned that he was a son of Philip Boss and Biddie Brown. Obedience was called "Biddy" by friends and neighbors in both North Carolina and Illinois.

John's wife Betsy said she was born near Boldton, Lanc., England and baptized 18 Nov 1852, by John Horrocks. On another record she mentioned she was born at Chamore, Lancashire, England.

When the Pincock Family did the Temple work for John's sister-in-law, Jane, they had her married to John Boss, but John was only a lad of nine years at the time his eldest brother, William married Jane Pincock.

In the LDS Archive Collection there are many family sheets on Philip and Obedience Brown Boss. Many sheets are basically copies from other sheets without any research being done. This business of copying from other also perpetuates the errors. Every sheet listed John Boss married to Elizabeth Hancock. John was born 2 Dec 1835, in Davidson Co., North Carolina. He married Mrs. Elizabeth "Betsy" Horrocks Taylor who was born 25 Nov 1836, in Chamore, Lanc. England, a daughter of James Horrocks and Ann Howarth. She had married first, Joseph Taylor. They had several children and lived in Heber City, Wasatch, Utah.

John and Betsy lived in Santaquin, Utah Co., Utah. They died there and are buried in the Santaquin Cemetery. He died 6 Sep. 1920, and Betsy 11 Sep. 1931.

The Santaquin Church records list several times the information on its members, including John and Betsy Boss.

A list of the descendants of Philip and Obedience Brown Boss has been given to James B. Klein to accompany this record.
____________________________________________________

Document Data

Notes: Minor spelling and punctuation corrections provided.
Sources: As identified by Erold C. Wiscombe.
Copyright: Used by permission.
Level: B (document verified and proofed by the transcriber or typist).
Certificate: Document Donor: Erold C. Wiscombe, January 25, 2001. Transcribed: Erold C. Wiscombe, January, 2001. Verified/Proofed: Erold C. Wiscombe January, 2001. See Donors.

Editor’s Note:
Erold prepared family group sheets reflecting this new information, which will be placed in the Library once a GEDCOM file has been prepared using this information.
____________________________________________________

  1. Family Research Projects
  2. Please let all of us know what research projects you are working on so that all family researchers can coordinate and share our information. We invite you to share your research projects and their status so that they may be published here. Please email your information to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

  3. Family Research Ideas and Theories
  4. Please let all of us know what research ideas and theories you are thinking about so we can coordinate and share our information. We invite you to share your ideas and theories and their status so that they may be published here. Please email your information to librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

  5. Next Journal Issue: Spring 2001 to be published June 30, 2001

We look forward to receiving your contributions for the Spring issue, which will be electronically published on the Internet on June 30, 2001. Thank you.

Footnotes:

1.  Published quarterly: March 31; June 30; September 30; December 31. Free subscriptions are available on the Internet. Mailed subscriptions are available at $5.00 per issue, prepaid. Send all inquiries, Internet subscription requests, information, articles and manuscripts according to Journal Policies to O. James Brown Klein, Editor and Publisher, at librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Sponsored by the Klein Storrs Family Association, O. James Brown Klein, President. Affiliated with the William and Margret Brown Family History Library and Center on the Internet at http://www.brownhistory.org
.

2.  William and Margret BROWN lived in Rowan County, North Carolina in the mid-1700s, with most, if not all of their 9 children. William was of English and perhaps Scottish descent, and Margret might be of Portuguese descent. We do not yet know who are their ancestors or siblings, and we only have verified who are their children, and some of their descendents through one of their children, James BROWN. Any one having any oral or written clues or evidence that verifies, clarifies or even mentions the origins of William and Margaret are requested to provide such information immediately to the librarian.brownhistory@gmail.com. Thank you.

3.  O. James Brown Klein (Jim Klein) is a direct descendent of William and Margret BROWN. They are his maternal third great grand father and grand mother. Jim is an attorney and business man living in Mesa, Arizona.

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